The BRZ could be one of the best kept secrets for track work.

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I have driven the Subaru BRZ a bunch of times, both as a Subaru and as the Toyota FRS variant. Biggest difference between the two is that the Subaru version has a slightly fancier interior. The vehicles are basically one in the same because the BRZ was a combined effort between Subaru and Toyota. The two companies set out to build a low-budget low center of gravy two-wheel drive sports coupe that would keep you grinning from ear to ear as you apexed each turn of a country road.

In my previous reviews of the BRZ, I discussed its road handling characteristics, its performance characteristics, and its interior design. So for this story, I want to highlight BRZ’s track work, or lack of track work to be specific. I say lack of track work because I have seen the Subaru BRZ (or Scion/Toyota FRS) on the track less than a handful of time. This is shocking because I am on track at least a dozen times a year with SCCA and PCA. The BRZ could be one of the best kept secrets for track work, because the car handles exceptionally well and it is low cost. Miata’s dominate the amateur racing world for that very same reason, but the Miata is convertible, which inherently isn’t as a safe or as rigid as a coupe. There are also dozen of performance mods for the BRZ that are seemingly low cost – you can check them out first hand at almost every Cars & Coffee outing.

So for those of you looking for your next track car, I urge you to take a second look at the Subaru BRZ. It is a peppy little sports coupe with the heart of a go-kart.