A Ferocious Beast Dressed in a Bespoke Tuxedo

Generally, when one thinks about monstrous V8s stuffed into daily-driver applications, Dodge and Chrysler come to mind. So, when we received this Cadillac CT5 V Blackwing, a GM product with a hand-built, supercharged 6.2 liter, 668hp V8 fitted to a midsized sedan, we knew we were in for something special. Everything, from the loud snarls and pops of the exhaust, to the mechanical whistle of the supercharger, to the silky-smooth 6-speed full manual (yes, a true 3-pedal manual mated to a V8!) transmission gives the sense that this car was designed and built by enthusiasts, for enthusiasts. Not to mention, this is likely one of the few cars period, including supercars, which can reach over 200mph on a race track. 

While the carbon-fiber splitter, aggressive, flared wheel arches and rear spoiler & diffuser suggest to a casual onlooker that this is a special car, this CT5 still looks tastefully subdued and mature, unlike some flashier options from competitors. Thankfully missing are aggressive neon decals and stripes, and the plethora of badges that make some of the other offerings in this segment resemble kids’ sneakers. This is conservative and tasteful ensemble at home at a country club, at the front of any valet parking, and, with  a stomp of the right pedal, on any race track in the world.  

Unlike most supercars that require the driver to sacrifice practicality for performance, this CT5 Blackwing has three seats in back for taking the whole family for a ride, or as in our case, taking the entire crew out to lunch. The interior of our test car kept up the sporty image with carbon fiber trim and race-like, tri-color bucket seats in the front, with black and white leather trimmed with red. With the base CT5 starting at only $37,000, there are some disappointingly-base carryover interior panels that feel below-grade, but overall, the quality and tech makes the interior is a great place to spend time in. There is plenty of legroom and space for the two front passengers; however, with a full five in the car, we were admittedly a little cramped. The seating crunch might be to make space for the enormous trunk, which makes the car great for family road trips, or for storing race track gear. 

To bring all that supercharged might to a stop, our test car was equipped with the optional carbon ceramic Brembo brakes, which are designed to brake harder, faster, and dissipate heat better than steel rotors. Whether ceramic brakes are worth the $8k upcharge is up to the individual enthusiast looking to tame this beast. 

In the era of downsizing, turbocharging and electrification, being able to drive off the dealer lot in a 3-pedal manual V8 with supercar power and luxurious accommodations is a gem in itself. To be able to have all this for just over $115,000 (price is tested), is a truly compelling overall package from GM priced thousands below its German competitors.