Range Rover Sport SVR: The only true Super SUV

Lamborghini created the Urus to be a ultra-high performance SUV, however it lacks real off-road capabilities and significant cargo capacity. So does that still make it a true SUV? It has super car performance, but in my opinion it lacks the UV in sport utility vehicle. It is the “SUV” you buy if you wish you were driving a super car, but can’t right now because you have two kids and a dog in the backseat.

Rolls Royce’s newest member of family is the Cullinan, named after the world’s largest diamond. It is by far the most luxurious car in the world with 4X4 capabilities. It is definitely super luxury. I drove one about 6-months ago, and I was supremely impressed by the supple cabin and the isolated driving experience. To be fair, it is hard to say something negative about any Rolls Royce, because their cars are superb. But lets face it, it is not the quickest SUV on the market, so it can’t hold the title of super high performance. Additionally, it would be disrespectful to damage a handcrafted piece of machinery as fine as a Rolls Royce while you are driving off road. So the utility piece is also missing from the equation.

So with the two most expensive SUVs on the market not deserving the “Super SUV” title, what is left? There always is the original King of sporty SUVs, the Range Rover Sport. And like a few of its predecessors, the SVR edition brings super performance to a super capable and super luxury SUV.

In terms of performance, one work: Supercharged. Range Rover Sport SVR comes standard with a 5.0L supercharged V8 that pumps out 575 horsepower – on par with the McLaren 540C. It is a heavy vehicle (for a performance oriented machine), but it can still do 0 to 60 mph in 4.3 seconds and reach a top speed of 176 mph – impressive for a 5,000 pound vehicle. And because it is an SVR, it offers comparatively exceptional grip thanks to sticky Pirelli tires, a re-tuned suspension, and Active Dynamics damping. So the performance benchmarks makes this a Super SUV.

In terms of capability, two words: Land Rover. Their all-wheel drive system with locking differentials and a low-speed transfer case will get you out of any situation. This includes water, because the Range Rover Sport SVR can wade through a shallow river – 33.5 inches to be exact. You can also tackle rock climbs thanks to its height adjustable suspension. Also in terms of capabilities, you can two up to 6,613 pounds and carry 27.5 cubic feet of cargo. So the capability benchmarks makes this a Super SUV.

In terms of luxury, there words: It is British. The Range Rover Sport SVR is sportiest of the Range Rover fleet, but it is still incredibly posh inside. My test vehicle was covered top to bottom in supple leather with real aluminum and carbon fiber trim. The no-cost option performance seats are not as comfortable as the standard seats in regular Range Rover Sports, but the performance seats still perfectly mold to your body. In comfort mode the vehicle offered a smooth and quite ride – in contract to sport mode which opens the exhaust baffles, lowers the ride height, and tightens the dampers. And for the technology enthusiast: three large displays on the instrument cluster and center console put everything at your finger tips. From level 3 semi-autonomous driving to high quality audio coming out of the 23-speaker Meridian sound system. So the luxury benchmarks makes this a Super SUV.

The 2020 Range Rover Sport SVR is the only vehicle that checks all the boxes for a true Super SUV. And since it starts at around $120,000, versus the Lamborghini at ~$200k and the Rolls Royce at ~$325k, the Range Rover Sport SVR is offered at a super price. I can’t think of a better high performance and capable daily driver.

Up Close With The C8 Corvette Convertible

I have been to a number of “Super Car World Premier Parties,” but none of them had me as giddy as the Corvette Convertible’s introduction last week. I was finally able to touch and feel a car that fans of the Corvette (including myself) have been begging to get for decades.

With the Corvette coupe, we asked for a mid-engine sports car that could keep up with our European rivals. What we got was an American made super car that could not only keep up with, but also out price EVERYTHING on the market. This includes Italy’s Ferrari 488 GTB, England’s McLaren 720S, Germany’s Audi R8, and Japan’s Acura NSX. The Corvette comes in at 1/2 the price or less than all of these machines.

There was no doubt that Chevrolet would give us a convertible Corvette – it is a tradition that dates back to the very first Corvette – but I didn’t realize that the 2020 Corvette Convertible would look this good! Its top down silhouette is an enchanced replica of the Ferrari 488 spider, complete with speedster humps. But for some reason, the speedster humps look better on the Chevy than they do on the Ferrari.

Also just like the Ferrari and the McLaren, we now have a retractable hardtop convertible. This means that you get best of both worlds: a topless experience for when the sun is shining, and a “coupe” experience for the race track.

And for those track day enthusiasts, you will be delighted to know that Chevrolet designed the Corvette to be a convertible from the start. That means both the coupe and convertible should be just as rigid, and offer similar handling characteristics. And with only a ~150 weight difference, both are expected to rocket from 0 to 60 mph in less than 3 seconds… like I said before, super car performance.

The Corvette I got to sit in was a preproduction prototype with the top-of-the-line LT3 package. So the fit and finish was spectacular – $200k super car quality for 1/2 the price.

In fact on the way back from my C8 experience, a fellow journalist and I marveled at how Chevrolet’s $67,000 Corvette is going to radically change the sports car and super car world if the performance benchmarks live up to their claims. It is Porsche Boxster pricing, but with Porsche 911 Turbo performance.

I might actually have to trade my Porsche in for one… or add a C8 to the stable.

BONUS: I got to touch Neil Armstrong’s completely original untouched 1967 Corvette Stingray. You might recognized it from Season 3, Episode 9 of the Grand Tour on Amazon Prime.

The Hyundai Palisade: It is pure trickery

Cheap is rarely a bad word, especially when it is used to describe a great value. So when I say that the 2020 Hyundai Palisade is cheap, I mean that to the extreme. It is the bargain of a century! Driving the vehicle on a four-hour road trip to attend a conference, I often lost myself in this sub-$50,000 luxury suv. In fact, I would argue that the Palisade is better than most $80,000+ full-size SUVs on the market.

Let’s face it, true luxury vehicles are not about fancy technologies or 0-to-60mph times. They are about isolating you from the rest of the world. And, the Palisade does just that. Its supple ride mitigates bumps akin to what you would expect from a Mercedes SUV and its noise insulation properties make it supremely quite. I had a group of people in the vehicle curiously ask: “who makes this?” Without the big H on the front, its exterior styling cues would make you think German versus Korean. Click Here To Continue Reading

The Lexus LC500 Surprises & Delights

My Father is an automotive enthusiast and a former SCCA Championship racer, so it is no surprise that he prefers a sports car for his daily driver. The only challenge is, like most people in their 80s, he is wants comfort in his old age. It is rare to find a truly comfortable luxury vehicle that also brings a little sports car excitement to the mix. 9 times out of 10, you are trading comfort for sport. He has been using Mercedes SL550 roadsters for the past 15 years as his daily driver. Which does the job when not wanting to drive a super car, but he was curious to find something new and more comfortable for everyday use. We looked at a few different options, including the new Aston Martin Vantage, BMW 8-Series, and the Maserati Gran Turismo. All great cars, but none of them were quite like the Lexus LC500 that I recently tested.

Ascetically, the Lexus LC500 is a sexy car with large 21″ wheels and a timeless flowing design. Do I dare say it is one of the best looking two-door cars on the market? It even looks fast with door handles that integrate into the body for improved aerodynamics. Looks are not everything; I have seen quite a few cars recently that look fast, but don’t deliver a punch with your smash the gas pedal.

In terms of performance, the Lexus LC500 comes standard with a naturally aspirated 5.0L V8 that pumps out 471 horsepower and 389 Pounds of Torque. The engine is mated with a 10-speed traditional automatic gearbox. This combination is way more than enough to be dangerous. The drivetrain also sounds dangerous with a throaty roar coming out of the back of the two exhaust pipes. Behind the wheel, the steering felt sharp in Sport S+ mode, and the vehicle tracks nicely around corners. You get a little understeer, but that is better than oversteer with this type of car. So the thrills are there, which isn’t surprising because Lexus has been working diligently to promote their sporty image and Toyota’s racing heritage.

What surprised and delighted me though was how civilized the LC500 becomes in Comfort Mode. It drives like Lexus’ big LS sedan. It is easy to forget that you are in a sports car when you are listening to smooth jazz on a Mark Levinson surround sound system and riding in a cabin that can be whisper quite at the touch of a button – thanks to the adjustable exhaust and a well insulated cabin. The interior of my test vehicle was wrapped from top to bottom in leather and alcantara for an ultra-luxury experience. Plus the ride and steering feedback are buttery smooth in Comfort mode, just like you would expect from a luxury sedan.

See this where the Lexus LC500 truly shines: It is a dragon slaying ninja with on ramps and on twisty roads. It is a “pass me the Grey Poupon” cruiser on freeways. While the Aston Martin, Mercedes, BMW, and Maserati deliver in terms of performance, you never truly forget that you are sacrificing comfort for speed. In comparison, this makes the LC500 one of the few true grand touring cars on the market; you can escape the displeasure of driving a high performance vehicle without having to change vehciles.

My Father is still weighing his options on what his Mercedes SL550 replacement will be, but the Lexus LC500 will surly be a top contender. I suggest that you visit your local Lexus dealer if you facing a similar conundrum.

This Is Why I Switched From The Porsche Dealer To An Independent Mechanic

This is not a paid review. I did not receive any compensation for telling this story.

Like most automotive journalists, I drive a press vehicle as my daily driver. It is awesome driving the latest and greatest, including vehicles ranging from family wagons to super cars. But being a car guy and a track day enthusiast, I have to own at least one car.

A little over 5 years ago I purchased an out of state 2001 Porsche Boxster S with 20,000 miles on the odometer and detailed service records from the previous owner’s local Porsche dealer. Having drank the manufacturer cool-aid, I thought the dealer was the best way to go. So for five years, my baby went to the dealer for regular oil changes, brake flushes, and minor wear and tear item repairs. I knew that I was likely paying more, but I was also getting the free lattes and cookies, a Porsche loaner vehicle, and the piece of mind that the mechanic working on my car should be a Porsche expert… but the later is not always the case.

A month before the annual Porsche Parade (The Porsche Club of America’s National Convention), I noticed a consistent harsh noise every time I made a high speed tight left turn while applying the throttle. This noise was especially troublesome because I was planning to enter my Boxster into the club’s autocross race during Porsche Parade. So I dropped my baby off at the local Porsche dealer in South Florida to be diagnosed and they gave me a shiny new Macan to drive. A week later the dealership’s Service Advisor called me up and said that my issue was related to suspension components. $2,000 later my vehicle was fixed and ready to be picked up. Assuming that my Porsche was in tip top shape, I drove leisurely on the way home and my car sat in the garage for a couple weeks.

Fast forward to Porsche Parade week… it was finally time to test my skills in the autocross competition at Palm Beach International Raceway. Every left turn, my stomach twisted as my car screeched a harsh noise. I instantly knew the problem was NOT fixed. Luckily the Porsche community is an amazing group of individuals, and one of my friends at Parade recommended a local independent mechanic who is experienced with working on first generation Boxsters. I was hesitant to make the jump, but I was disappointed that my local dealer, who should know everything about my car, didn’t fix the problem the first time – especially after having my car for over a week.

The following Monday I visited Foreign Affairs Motorsport and met with Bobby, the owner’s son. You could immediately tell that they are true gear heads, with automotive memorabilia and motorsports trophies on nearly every wall of the front office. Their passion is Porsche, but other European brands were also in their shop: a Lamborghini, a Bentley, and several BMWs. I told Bobby what my Porsche’s symptoms were and the history of the problem. To my pleasant surprise, he asked me to take him for a ride in order to reproduce the noise – the dealer never offered this. We drove the vehicle around the block and Bobby almost immediately had an idea of what was causing the problem – it wasn’t a suspension noise. He then put my car on the rack and conferred with his head mechanic. Two years ago, a Porsche 911 Turbo was experiencing the same problem on the race track. The culprit was that the transmission mounts went bad on one side. How could the dealer have missed that? Bobby brought me into the shop and showed me how with his hands he could giggle the section back and forth. The root of my problem was a $1,000 transmission mount issue versus a $2,000 suspension problem.

During his team’s inspection of my vehicle, the mechanic also noticed that my water pump was leaking and that I had a small oil leak. Without asking, Bobby personally showed me the leaks. My local Porsche dealer never let me into the active shop. While both problems were minor, both could lead to catastrophic engine problems in the future. How could my local dealer have missed this too??? I guess they were too focused on selling me a new Porsche.

After this experience, Foreign Affair Motorsport has my business for life. With that being said, there are two instances where I wouldn’t use them: 1) If I am driving a new car where the parts and labor are covered under a manufacturer’s warranty. 2) If I am driving a vehicle that they don’t service. I.E. American and Japanese cars.

Tips for picking an independent mechanic:

  • Check the shop’s references. Do you have a family member or a friend who has had good experiences with the shop? If not, check the shop’s Yelp reviews.
  • Go to a shop that specializes in your type of vehicle. Do they have similar vehicles on the racks or parked outside? Don’t just look at their website, a mechanic who is use to working on your vehicle will be able to troubleshoot the root of the problem quicker.
  • Pick a shop that wants to educate you. Does the mechanic show you the bad part? Does the mechanic offer preventive maintenance advice in order to prevent major problems in the future.

The BMW X3 has grown up!

The 2020 BMW X3 versus 2000 BMW X5

I will admit from the start, it has been a while since I have driven a BMW X3. I haven’t seen one in the press fleet down here in Florida in a long time. However, I was recently in Michigan for a week to escape the Florida summer heat and get some seat time in the X3… aka the baby X5.

The third generation feels much more substantial than previous generations. This time around the X3 felt more like the original X5, in terms of size, performance, and creature comforts…

Size & Weight

The 2000 BMW X5 weighed in at 4,800 pounds, and was 184″ long and 74″ wide. It was a trend setter in the SUV arena, because it was one of the first performance oriented SUVs – it could actually hug corners. In comparison, the 2020 BMW X3 weighs in at 3,900 pounds, and it is 2 inches larger and 1/2 an inch wider than the 1st generation X5. The increased size translates into a similar cabin space for occupants and more cargo room. The X3’s weight savings despite its proportion is thank to 20 years of BMW R&D into aluminum and other modern materials.

Performance & Driving Experience

Although the latest generation X3 is bigger than the first generation X5, the base X3 engine is less than 1/2 the size of the top-of-the-line X5 of the era. The original BMW X5 optionally packed a 4.4L V8 producing 282 horsepower and 324 torque. Where as the 2020 BMW X3 comes standard with a 2L twin-turbo inline 4-cylinder that pumps out 248 horsepower and 258 torque. The 2020 X3 doesn’t have a mighty V8, but it accelerates blistering fast in comparison due to the X3’s 8-speed automatic gearbox and weight savings: X3 0-60mph in 6.0 seconds, versus X5 0-60mph in 7.4 seconds. In terms of hugging corners though Click Here To Continue Reading

2020 Nissan 370Z 50th Anniversary: An Historical Tribute To The 240Z

In 1970, the original Datsun (aka Nissan) 240Z quickly became a halo car for all Japanese manufactures. It proved that Japan wasn’t just a country for small economy cars; that they could make vehicles worthy to compete with best in-class sports cars from American and European automotive manufactures… The only way to beat them at their own game was to dominate them on the race track. My Father wasn’t the legendary John Morton or Bob Sharp, but he did race his 1970 Datsun 240Z with SCCA and won the 1973 Mid-Am Championships. I remember hearing stories from my Father, reminiscing about how he would easily win road course races against Corvettes and Porsches despite having less horsepower. The small and agile 240Z was able to outmatch the competition due to hits handling characteristics and comparatively modern overhead cam engine plus disc brakes. The 240Z’s race wins by Z drivers throughout the country made the car famous, but the engaging driving experience is what made cult following for Z cars.  Click Here To Continue Reading

Get It While You Still Can: the 2019 C7 Corvette Grand Sport

The 2020 Corvette is ushering in a new generation for America’s sports car. The C8’s mid-engine design means better handling around corners and improved grip off the line. The Corvette will finally and truly be able to keep up with the best from Porsche and Ferrari thanks to its new architecture.

Those in favor of the latest and greatest will love the mid-engine C8, but let’s not forget the C7. It represents the pinnacle of front-engine sports cars with a 60+ year heritage. And since this is the last generation of front engine cars using the Corvette name plate, it will surely become a collectible.

Upon first approach, the long sweeping hood paired with hood scoops and side scoops scream race car. They are a visual tease to the 6.2L naturally aspirated V8 lying under the long hood, just behind the front axel. The pushrod engine pumps out 460 horsepower and 465 pounds-of-torque, which can be paired with either an 8-speed automatic or 7-speed manual transmission. This will be your last chance to get a new Corvette with a manual transmission, so get it while you still can. Dual clutch transmissions, like on the 2020 C8 Corvette produce better lap times due to quicker shifts and reduced power loss, but they lack the emotion connection of manually sliding through the gears one by one. Click Here To Continue Reading

Battle of the Lightweights: Porsche Macan versus Range Rover Evoque R-Dynamic

Both of these vehicles are the baby of the family. With the Porsche Macan being the little brother to the Cayenne, and the Range Rover Evoque being the little brother to the Range Rover Sport (plus Velar and the full-size Range Rover). I recently deemed that a showdown of Macan versus Evoque was in order since both of the vehicles are in the same compact sporty crossover segment.

Performance

While neither the Macan nor the Evoque are true sports cars, both vehicles are designed to outpace sports cars of yesteryear.

The Porsche Macan with its 7-speed dual-clutch transmission and 248 horsepower inline 4-cylinder has been known to ring in quicker lap times than Porsche sports cars from the 1980s. I found the Macan to be well balanced and extremely nimble for a crossover. The steering was also very precise, especially for turn-ins on a tight course.

The Range Rover Evoque R-Dynamic tackles performance with brute force in comparison. The nearly 300 horsepower turbocharged 4-cylinder presses your head back when you smash the gas pedal. Not rocket ship fast, but it is noticeably more cinematic than the Macan thanks to over 20 pounds of additional torque. Around corners, the Evoque didn’t feel as precise as the Macan and I seemingly experienced more body roll.  Click Here To Continue Reading

35 Years of the VW Jetta GLI

The GLI for Volkswagen in many regards is the equivalent of the M3 for BMW. While the performance benchmarks are not quite the same, the spirit of taking the brand’s highest volume vehicle and making it thrilling to drive is all the same. In this case the GLI takes VW popular compact sedan, the Jetta, and turns the cool factor up to 10 for its 35th Anniversary.

Notable differences on the VW Jetta GLI 35th Anniversary Edition exterior are a striking blackout grill and 20″ wheels with a red accent piece. You will also quickly discover a seductive black rear spoiler, black painted roof, and mirrors. You also get red painted brake calibers to complete the look.

Inside the GLI I tested you will find a stylish new interior design language complete with red stitching and a flat bottom steering wheel to give the GLI an extra edge over previous generations.

The 35th Anniversary Edition of the Jetta GLI isn’t just all flash. Enthusiastic drivers will enjoy an upgraded 2.0L turbocharged 4-cylinder that produces a respectable (for the type of car and price point) 228 horsepower. The GLI is unfortunately front-Wheel-drive only, however it does come standard with a limited slip differential.

The price as equipped was under $28,000, which seems like a bargain for such a cool looking car.

In read world situations, I found the car quite pleasurable to own (for a week). Multiple people took notice of the car. This includes the valet at the Ritz-Carlton, who gave me two thumbs up and asked inquisitively about GLI. He found the 35th Anniversary livery a rare site. I also found the vehicle to be surprisingly comfortable on long distance drives. The Jetta GLI has great visibility and felt very stable at highway speeds.

Now the question is… where do I sign as the 35th Anniversary Edition surely won’t be here long.